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I love this idea and thought I would pass it along.

The Knitted Chick

When I was cleaning out my linen closet a couple months ago, I came across a forgotten stack of bandanas. I had forgotten I even had them, it was so long since they had been used. I formerly had taken them to Pioneer Village Living History Museum, just north of Phoenix, for use as costumes by the boys in my school class, when we were on that field trip. (But it’s been five years since that district banned field trips for financial reasons!) So, being in a “piecing” frame of mind, I had the idea of sewing them together to make a tablecloth long enough to cover one of those 8 foot city park picnic tables. Luckily, I had 18 bandanas, so I . . .
1st–arranged them (still folded up) into an array of 6 rows of 3 columns. And with only 1 coral, 1 turquoise, 1 purple, and…

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Wrinkled Fingers and Time


 
A wrinkled finger after a warm bath
Image via Wikipedia

This has been a busy two weeks.  We, (Mom & Me,) have washed, pressed and folded more vintage linen in the last two weeks then we would have in an entire lifetime.  We both have wrinkled fingers.  I have to admit, half the time we sat admiring the linens we held and the other half of the time, between the folding and stacking, was devoted to commenting on them.  What is it about a pure white or cream Damask tablecloth that brings a sparkle into ones eye?  What is it about a table napkin with 1950’s colors and patterns that bring me back into an era I would have longed to live in?  What causes me to pause when I hold up a bit of vintage pillow lace?  Is it the thought that someone, years early, in a quiet and dusky room, sat patiently and painstakingly, twisting and turning each individual bobbin until inch by inch this lovely delicate pattern emerged?  Perhaps that’s why when I try to press out the wrinkles accumulated over the years it sat idle, I don’t get frustrated.  If they had the patience to make it beautiful, I have the patience to present it properly. 

Lace
Lace (Photo credit: Nefi)

Take a look the next time you are in our store.  We put our lace pieces in the lace basket, usually in zip-lock bags to keep them clean.  See if you see what we see and then let us know what you felt when you ran it through your fingers and held it up to the light.  I guarantee you will come to appreciate it more when you apply it to your new dress or table creation.

Until next time, recycle, repurpose and stay green.

New Cape Hatteras beaching driving rules face legal test


You would think that common sense would prevail.  During the laying or hatching season, stay off the beach.

Summit County Citizens Voice

Motorized users go to court to block new regulations

By Summit Voice

SUMMIT COUNTY — The battle over motorized use of public lands extends far beyond the mountains and forests of Colorado and the deserts of the Southwest.

On the East Coast, motorized users last week went to court to try and overturn a new set of rules governing motorized use at Cape Hatteras National Seashore — despite the fact that the Cape Hatteras Access Preservation Alliance’s lawsuit doesn’t honor a consent decree the group had previously signed.

The lawsuit challenges the Park Service’s planning and environmental review process, claiming the agency failed to give “meaningful consideration to views, data, or information that were contrary to NPS’s desire to impose more severe restrictions on ORV access and use; a failure to look at reasonable alternatives, including smaller and more flexible buffer and closure areas; and a failure to properly assess…

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upcycled napkins {diy}


napkin diy




Remember the pillowcase I picked up here? Well now we’re enjoying it as a new set of napkins – just in time to complement my new cooking skills!

I love upcycled projects like this, especially when they’re as easy as one two three (cut, iron, sew – oh and of course pre-wash so make that four).

Buen provecho!

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Anti what?


Did you ever see lace doilies covering the back of a chair or couch?  Think 18th & 19th century, or Byron.  Did you know that at one time they were more than decorative?  They had a purpose.

You see at one time men of the family oiled their hair with oil of Antimacassar DoilyMacassar.  It gave them that irresistible look, plus it hid the smell of unwashed hair.  Needless to say this oil didn’t do the furniture any good and over time, it would stain it to the point that the material would be ruined.   Somewhere along the line, an industrious homemaker came up with the idea to hang a doily along the area where her hubby’s moldy – oily head rested.  Problem solved.  Easier to wash a doily then to wash a chair.

Now the special use doilies became known as antimacassars.   Today we see similar chair protectors on the back of seats in commercial airlines or Amtrak coaches.

Needless to say, we have a display of these antique doilies in our store.  Look for them soon on our repurposed magazine rack.

Make a plan – then make another.


9:00 PM Thursday and I’m tired. I am just putting the  finishing touches on a colorful border that will go up along the shelf in our store. I am using some odd sized material and scrap lace that doesn’t come up to a yard. It will be neat, trust me. Anyway, just as I am about to finish, “the disruptor” (my husband) turns towards me and says, “Here” and he hands me a printed rectangle and some paper pieces he has cut out and laid on top of the sheet.

“What’s this? I ask. “Are we taking up paper dolls?” ( I get “the look.” Strike 1) “No,” he answers. “This is the floor plan for the layout of the linen store. I told you that I thought we should change the store around to give it a new look, so here’s my idea.”

“These tiny scraps of paper are your idea?” I asked with my usual incredulous look on my face. You would think I would know better. Strike 2

“No,” he said patently, this is the stores floor plan in scale. We are going to shift the pieces around on the paper until it looks the way we want it.

His idea has merit and I know it.  Plan it out on paper before you just jump into something.  He’s right in his thinking but, I hear myself saying, “It’s 9:30 in the evening. I have to be up at 6:00 AM – can this wait until tomorrow?”   I knew the minute the words left my mouth – I was in trouble. The look on his face was similar to the first look he had when I told him I dented the car.  Strike 3.

What I should have said was – “It looks great dear – let’s wait until tomorrow to work on it. Instead, we worked on it that night. Little scale pieces of cabinets and shelves, moved around on the paper until they were just right.  The following morning I woke to find a completely different layout then what we had the night before.  It figures. He always does this.  By midnight, I was convinced he was saying yes only to humor me anyway.

The one thing I learned about all this is that you have to be able to visualize flat plans in three dimensions. I can’t when it comes to floor plans. That was frustrating to both of us, because I can see a dress pattern in three dimensions.  I can see the finished dress or project when it is nothing more than a bolt of cloth, folded readied for cutting.  It has to be  genetics.  I won’t go so far as saying that’s what makes us women, because there are many excellent men fashion designers, just as there are women architects.   The significant trait is the ability to visualize in three dimension, regardless of the gender.

I still couldn’t visualize his plan on paper, but what he had done in anticipation of this, was build it out using our daughters Lego‘s.    Now I could see it.   What a great idea.  Try it the next time you’re trying to figure out a room layout.  Now if they could only make a dress pattern Lego, what a great world this would be.

Until next time, recycle, repurpose and stay green.

Beer in My Coffee Stain.


Coffee Stain
A coffee stain that is sure to ruin someones day.

Recently, I had purchased some nice table linens from an estate sale.  I was very pleased with my purchases even though you could tell they had been stored a long time.  They had that “stuffed and tucked away” smell to them.  I wash and iron all linens anyway, but imagine my dismay when I opened up the white tablecloth and found a rather large, light coffee colored stain along one whole border

I had once read where you could use a baby wipe to blot up coffee spills from your rug or carpet; it absorbs both the liquid and the stain.  I thought that a great idea so I grabbed some from the car that I carry there for when my husband makes a mess.  I am regularly attacking coffee spills he gets on himself from his old drippy coffee cup he never washes.  Trouble was, they were too dried out from having sat there in the hot car after someone (him) had left them open. 

So when the baby wipes didn’t work, I turned to my dog-eared copy of Heloise where she advised using baking soda.  I quickly figured out that baking soda would work if the stain was brand new, but for coffee stains that had been washed and set in – baking soda didn’t seem seem to be the solution. 

Beer was the next suggestion and much to my husbands dismay I figured the better the beer, the better the results.  I suppose I should have asked him first before I snatched the beer from his hands.  Seems you can soak the stain in beer and it should remove the stain quite well.  Three beers later, two of which I drank while waiting, the stain was fainter but still there.  I, on the other hand, was fading quickly. 

By this time, I was desperate, frustrated and, I must admit – a little light-headed.  (That’s my description and I am sticking with it.)  I was also frustrated.  Grabbing a bowl, I poured the rest of the beer in it and dumped about – let’s say – a quarter of a box of baking soda into it – just for good measure.  The mixtures foamed all over the place and gradually settled down to this mush like mixture, which I put a lid on as I went to bed. 

By the time I woke up the next morning, slowly walked into the kitchen and then remembered what I did, I half expected to take the lid off and find a large hole where the spot had once been.  I didn’t – thank goodness.  Instead, I found a clean white space where the stain had once been.  Excitedly, I told my husband while holding up the table linen   He nodded once, grabbed his tool chest and then spent the morning putting a lock on his beer cooler. 

Later I read that had I brushed the mushy mess into the fabric using a soft hand brush, it would have done the same thing – but quicker.  If you don’t drink the beer, it also helps get the stain out faster, because then – you would have read that last part of the instruction.  However, what fun would there be in that? 

Use these suggestions only on white linens and it’s OK to use cheap beer. 

Until next time, repurposed, recycle and stay green.